» Home   » About us    » Terms/Faq    » News   
 
Facebook Twitter Google +
 
LATEST NEWS
Tickets for  Bolshoi Theater in Moscow
 
Tickets for opera,ballet and classic concerts season in Moscow . Buy online tickets at best prices for the new opera and ballet events in Moscow at Bolshoi Theater. Booking for Bolshoi Theater in Moscow.

Boris Godunov tickets

» Home    » Bolshoi Theatre Moscow    » Bolshoi Opera Tickets    » Boris Godunov
 
 
Boris Godunov

Venue: Bolshoi Theatre

 
Theatre Square, 1
Moscow, Russia
125009
 
 
All dates
Season 2017
 

Buy online tickets

 
Next performance (see season calendar above for other dates)
Boris Godunov
Thu 25 May 2017
Tickets
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:00 Historic Stage
SOLD OUT
 
 
Boris Godunov
Fri 26 May 2017
Tickets
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:00 Historic Stage
SOLD OUT
 
 
Boris Godunov
Sat 27 May 2017
Tickets
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:00 Historic Stage
SOLD OUT
 
 
 
Event details
 
Composer: Modest Mussorgsky

Tickets are available on request. For reservation please contact us at:  office@moscowoperatickets.com

 

 

Boris Godunov at the Bolshoi

Ever since Fyodor Chaliapin’s triumphant appearance in the role at the Paris Opera, Boris Godunov is unqualifiedly consid­ered by Russian and world audiences to be the chief personage of Russian opera and its leading potentate. For the whole world today Mussorgsky’s opera is a key work on the abstract nature of power in general, with no need for concrete historical associations or the literal reproduction of realia.

Mussorgsky’s music, with its impetuous boldness, tangible back-to-the-soil solidity and incisive characterization, is of itself sufficient explanation for the tenacity of life of Boris Godunov. But for a longtime it was these very qualities which got in the way of the opera’s production, forcing the compos­er to compromise, rewrite the score, in an attempt to squeeze his epos into the canon of the usual historical drama. However, the Directorate of the Imperial Theatres rejected both his first and second revisions, passing but separate frag­ments of the work for performance. It was only Rimsky-Korsakov’s “smoothed down” version which enabled Boris Godunov to become a repertory work — but the whole of the opera’s following performance history is the story of a “return to sources”, of new editions of the score containing the latest musicological research, and, accordingly, the story of chang­ing accents in the staging.

However the placing of accents also depends on the per­sonality of the interpreter of the main role. Thus, it is well known, that one of the initiators of the Moscow 1888 pre­miere of the opera was Pavel Khokhlov, who sang the role of Boris alternating with Bogomir Korsov: the intuitive psycho­logical tension of the first-named was in contrast to the pro­fessional melodramatic training of the second-. But the real triumph was, without doubt, the production with Chaliapin. A worthy foil to Chaliapin here was Leonid Sobinov in the part of The Pretender: the personal drama of the Tsar-infanticide was played out with a soul-chilling authenticity. In the 20’s and 30’s the emphasis was put on the people’s drama: given for the first time at the Bolshoi, was the scene by St. Basil’s Cathedral, with Ivan Kozlovsky as The Simpleton. Each age has produced its great Borises: Grigory and Alexander Pirogov, Alexander Ognivtsev, Ivan Petrov, Yevgeny Nesterenko, and Vladimir Matorin have excelled in this role at the Bolshoi and abroad.

Boris Godunov at the Bolshoi Theatre attracted no less attention from the authorities than did Ivan Susanin. Morals and conscience, relations between the authorities and the people, the seething of emotion, love and ambition, atmos­pheric genre scenes — each age accentuated something of its own. However, regardless whether it is interpreted as a polit­ical parable or a miracle-play-drama, Boris Godunov remains one of the symbols of Russian music and Russian

 

Synopsis

Prologue
Scene 1
A crowd throngs by the high walls of the Novodevichy Monastery in Moscow. The boyar, Boris Godunov, has withdrawn to the monastery after the death of Tsar Fyodor, who did not leave an heir. That Boris will be elected to the throne is a foregone conclu­sion, but he makes a show of refusing the crown so that he is not suspected of wishing to seize power. At the order of a police offi­cer, the people beg Godunov to accept election to the throne:
“Do not abandon us, Father,
Do not leave us helpness!”

But Shchelkalov, secretary of the Duma, announces that Boris is implacable.

Scene 2
Square in front of the Cathedral of the As­sumption in the Kremlin. A majestic pealing of bells — Boris has given his consent and is being crowned. But Tsar Boris is not happy, he is weighed down by anxiety:
“My soul is heavy,
Some instinctive fear
With ominous foreboding
Rivets my heart...”

In the Kremlin the bells are pealing and the people break out again into acclamation.

Act I
Scene 1
Late at night. A cell in the Chudov Monaste­ry. By the light of an icon-lamp, the wise monk Pimen is writing a truthful chronicle of the history of the Russian state. In his chronicle, Pimen reveals the secret of the murder, by Boris Godunov, of Tsarevitch Dimitri who had stood between him and the throne. Grigory, a young novice, sharing Pimen’s cell, wakes up. He listens to the holy man’s tale and a storm of anxieties, passions and vainglorious ambitions breaks into the peace of the night. The idea comes to Grigo­ry of calling himself the Tsarevitch and of doing battle with Boris for the throne.

“Boris! Boris! All tremble before you,
No one dares to remind you
Of the fate of the hapless infant...
But meanwhile a hermit in a dark cell
Is writing a terrible denunciation against you.
And you shall not escape human judgment,
As you shall not escape the judgment of heaven!”

Scene 2
An inn near the Lithuanian frontier. Three va­gabond monks, Varlaam, Missail and Grigory, have dropped in on the sprightly, merry mistress of the establishment. Varlaam, a drunkard and glutton, sings a song about the capture of Kazan. Grigory, questions the mi­stress of the inn on the best route to Lithuania. A police officer comes into the inn: on the Tsar’s orders he is searching for the run­away monk, Grigory Otrepiev. After an un­successful attempt to deflect the suspicion from himself, Grigory leaps through the win­dow and makes good his escape.

Act II
Scene 3
The Tsar’s private apartment in the Kremlin. Tsarevitch Fyodor is looking at the “Book of the Big Drawing”, the first map of Russia. Ksenia, Boris’ daughter, is grieving before a portrait of her dead fiancй, the heir to the Danish throne. In an attempt to cheer her up, her old nurse tells her a funny story. Boris comes in and talks tenderly to his children, he is pleased to see his son gleaning wis­dom from a book. But even here, with his children, Boris is tormented by anguish. Russia has been visited by a terrible famine. “Peop­le affected with the plague wander about like wild animals”, and the common people bla­me the Tsar for all their troubles: “in the squ­ares they curse the name of Boris”. Some­thing approaching a groan breaks out from deep down inside the Tsar:
“All around is darkness and impenetrable gloom,
O, for a fleeting glimpse of a ray of joy!..
Some secret anxiety,
One inconstantly expecting disaster!..”

The boyar, Shuisky, comes in, a cunning courtier and leader of a group of boyars with seditious intentions. He brings bad news: a pretender has raised his head in Lithuania, having taken the name of the Tsarevitch Dimi­tri. He has the support of the King of Poland, the Polish nobles and the Pope. Boris requires Shuisky to tell him the truth: is he certain that the babe who was killed in the town of Uglich was the Tsarevitch Dimitri? Shuisky, enjoying the Tsar’s torment, descri­bes the deep wound on the Tsarevitch’s neck, and the angelic smile on his lips...
“It seemed, that in his cradle
He was peacefully sleeping...”

Shuisky departs, having aroused with new force the fears and agitation which grip Bo­ris: the latter now thinks he sees an appari­tion of the murdered Dimitri.

Act III
Scene 4
A ball in the garden of Mnishek, the Governor of Sandomir. The Polish nobles are preparing to march on Moscow. They mean to place their protйgй on the Russian throne: Grigory, the runaway monk from the Chudov monaste­ry, who has taken the name of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. In this they will be helped by the ambitious plans of the Governor’s daugh­ter, the beautiful Marina, who dreams of beco­ming the wife of the future king of Russia. The long-awaited (by the Pretender) rendez­vous between Marina and Dimitri who is in love with her takes place. However, Marina’s abrupt and calculating speech, and her de­termination, which she makes no attempt to conceal, to sit on the Russian throne discon­cert the Pretender for a brief moment. Reali­zing this, Marina wins him over by false pro­testations of her love for him. The Jesuit, Rangoni, celebrates his victory.

Scene 5
An early winter’s morning. A square in front of the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed in Moscow. A crowd of starving people are discussing the Pretender’s victories over the forces of Boris. A Simpleton comes running into the Square. Urchins surround him and take a kopek from him . The Tsar comes out of the Cathedral. “Bread, bread! Give the starving bread! Give us bread, father, for the sake of Christ!” cries the crowd. Goaded by the urchins, the Simple­ton addresses the Tsar: “Order them to be killed, as you killed the little Tsarevitch”. Boris tells the boyars not to seize the Simpleton:
“Let him be! Pray for me, simple person...”
But the Simpleton replies:
“No, Boris! It can not be done!
How can one pray for a Tsar Herod?
Our Lady does not allow it...”

Act IV
Scene 6
A clearing in the forest near Kromy. Night-­time. The peasants, who are in revolt, lead in a Kromy boyar whom they have taken pris­oner. They make fun of the boyar, reminding him of all their grudges:
“You trained us the right way,
In storms and bad weather, and when roads were impassable,
You exploited us,
And whipped us with a slender lash...”

The arrival of the monks, Varlaam and Missail, who denounce the sins of Boris, the regicide, stirs up the crowd’s anger even more. They break out into a threatening song:
“A dashing young force is on the rampage,
The Cossack blood is all aflame!
A great subversive power has risen from the depths...”

Jesuit priests, the Pretender’s emissaries, appear. But the arrival of these foreigners arouses the crowd’s indignation. The peas­ants drag the Jesuits into the forest to be hanged.

The Pretender, rides into the clearing, sur­rounded by troops, Polish gentry and Jesu­its. He frees the Kromy boyar. By promising his favor and protection, the Pretender per­suades the peasants to march on Moscow. The sky lights up with the glow of a fire. The alarm bell is rung. The Simpleton appears, looking round him in fear. His prophetic words of the new troubles that await the Russian people are spoken in anguish and pain:
“Flow, flow, bitter tears,
Cry, cry, Russian Orthodox soul!
Soon the enemy will come and darkness will fall,
Black, impenetrable darkness...”

Scene 7
The Granovitaya Chamber, in the Kremlin. A session of the Duma is in progress. The boyars are discussing what punishment sho­uld be meted out to the Pretender should he be caught. Shuisky appears. He describes the scene in the Tsar’s private apartment, when Boris drove off the apparition of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. At this point, Boris comes running in, shouting: “Away, away, child!” Catching sight of the boyars, he regains his self-control and asks them for advice and help. At this, Shuisky suggests to the Tsar that he listen to a holy man who has come to tell them of a great secret. Boris ag­rees. Pimen is brought in. Pimen’s tale of the miraculous cure of a sick man at the gra­ve of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri, in Uglich, is more than Boris can take and he falls senseless to the floor. Regaining conscious­ness, the dying Tsar gives his son advice on how to protect his kingdom:
“Don not trust the slander of the seditious boyars,
Keep a vigilant watch over their secret dealings with Lithuania,
Punish treason without mercy, without charity punish it,
Listen carefully to what the people say -
for their judgement is not hypocritical...”

To the pealing of the funeral bell and the chanting of a choir of monks, the Tsar dies. The shocked Tsarevitch Fyodor, having paid his last respects to his father, rises to his feet...And immediately, Shuisky who, unse­en, had crept ahead of him, blocks his way to the throne.

 
Program details
 

Boris Godunov
Opera in four acts

Libretto by Modest Mussorgsky, based on Alexander Pushkin’s play of the same name

Version and orchestration by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Orchestration of “At St. Basil Cathedral” scene by Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov

 

1948 production
Music Director: Nikolai Golovanov
Stage Director: Leonid Baratov
Designer: Fyodor Fedorovsky
Choreographer: Leonid Lavrovsky

2011 revival
Conductors: Vassily Sinaisky, Pavel Sorokin
Director: Igor Ushakov
Designer of scenery revival: Alyona Pikalova
Designer of costumes revival: Elena Zaytseva
Choreography revival: Ekaterina Mironova
Lighting Designer: Sergei Shevchenko
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov

 
Venue
 
Bolshoi Theatre
 

On 28 March (17 according to the old style) 1776, Catherine II granted the prosecutor, Prince Pyotr Urusov, the "privilege" of "maintaining" theatre performances of all kinds, including masquerades, balls and other forms of entertainment, for a period of ten years. And it is from this date that Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre traces its history.

The Bolshoi building, which for many years now has been regarded as one of Moscow’s main sights, was opened on 20 October 1856, on Tsar Alexander II’s coronation day.

On 29 October 2002 the Bolshoi was given a New Stage and it was here it presented its performances during the years the Historic Stage was undergoing massive reconstruction and refurbishment.

The reconstruction project lasted from l July 2005 to 28 October 2011. As a result of this reconstruction, many lost features of the historic building were reinstated and, at the same time, it has joined the ranks of most technically equipped theatre buildings in the world.

The Bolshoi Theatre is a symbol of Russia for all time. It was awarded this honor due to the major contribution it made to the history of the Russian performing arts. This history is on-going and today Bolshoi Theatre artists continue to contribute to it many bright pages.

 

An inherent part of the Theatre’s activities is the presentation of concerts of symphony and chamber works, and of operas in concert performance, thus acquainting the public with works of all music genres. 

Now that the Bolshoi Theatre has two stages at its disposal, one of them its legendary Historic Stage which is at last back in action again, it hopes to fulfill its mission with an even greater degree of success, steadily extending the sphere of its influence at home and throughout the world.

 

The Bolshoi has to a large extent reacquired its authentic historical appearance, lost during the years of Soviet power. The auditorium and part of its suite of halls now look as they were originally conceived by Bolshoi Theatre architect Alberto Cavos. While the former imperial foyer halls have been given back their 1895 decor, this was the year they were redecorated for Emperor Nicholas II’s coronation celebrations. Each reproduced or restored element of interior decoration was made the object of a special project for which separate documentation was collected based on numerous archival and on-site researches.

In 2010 the auditorium suite of halls were renovated: the Lobby, the Main or the White Foyer, the Choral, Exhibition, Round and Beethoven halls. Muscovites were able to admire the restored facades and the renovated symbol of the Bolshoi Theatre — the famous Apollo quadriga, created by the sculptor Peter Klodt.

The auditorium has regained its original beauty. And, just like the 19th century theatergoer, so each member of the public today will be dazzled by its extravagant and at the same time “light” décor. The bright crimson, scattered with gold, draping of the interiors of the boxes, the different on each level stucco arabesques, the Apollo and the Muses plafond — all this contributes to the auditorium’s breath-taking impact.

Special attention was paid to the restoration of the legendary acoustics. International experts did extensive research work and made sure all their technical recommendations were carried out to the letter.

State of the art machinery has been installed in the stagehouse. The Bolshoi Theatre Historic stage now consists of seven two-tier rising and descending platforms. These platforms can easily change their positions, thus the stage can become horizontal, raked or stepped. The stage and backstage area can be united which creates a stage space of incredible depth.

New upper stage equipment, remotely controlled by computer, makes it possible to derive maximum use from lighting, sound and visual effects. Cutting edge rigs have been installed for the deployment of lanterns, special effects apparatus and acoustics. 

The orchestra pit has been provided with extra space under the forestage. This makes it one of the biggest orchestra pits in the world seating up to 130 musicians, which is necessary for the performance of such large-scale works as, for instance, Wagner operas.

The installation of state of the art stage equipment was a unique world-scale project. The reconstruction has doubled the Theatre’s total floor space. Thanks to the expansion of the Theatre’s existing underground spaces (under stagehouse) and to the construction of new underground space under Theatre Square, this has been achieved without any change to the Theatre’s external appearance.

Thus the Theatre has acquired badly needed new space, including an underground concert and rehearsal room, which has inherited its name from the Beethoven Hall, under the Theatre lobby. This hall is a multi-functional space which can be used in different ways. It consists of five main platforms: the central platform is the stage itself, two platforms to the right and left of it can be used either to increase the size of the stage or as audience space. The two remaining platforms form the main space of the auditorium. All of the platforms can be raised to foyer level to create a space for holding formal, receptions. Apart from this concert hall and its auxiliary premises, the rest of the underground space under Theatre Square accommodates a large number of technical, service and staff rooms.

The Bolshoi Theatre reconstruction project also included the renovation of the Khomyakov House, a protected architectural monument of the first half of the nineteenth century situated immediately behind the Bolshoi, which has been transformed into a service wing. Due to numerous 20th century reconstructions, the historical interiors of the Khomyakov House have been totally lost. While its main walls have been preserved, the interior layout has been redesigned to meet the Theatre’s present-day requirements. Thus the Khomaykov House, which is linked to the main Bolshoi Theatre building by an underground tunnel, is a key element in the gigantic Bolshoi Theatre complex.

The renovation of the country’s main stage was a landmark event in the lives of a large coordinated team of highest-level professionals. Participating in the project were uniquely qualified specialists whose great feat of labor will earn them the undying gratitude of present-day Bolshoi Theatre audiences.

 

Car

Mokhovaya Street

If you are on Mokhovaya Street keep driving straight ahead, not turning off it, till you reach Theatre Square where the Bolshoi Theatre is situated.

Tverskaya Street

If you are moving down Tverskaya, in the direction of the centre, you will automatically find yourself on Teatralnyi Proezd Street leading to the Bolshoi Theatre.

Petrovka Street

If you are on the Petrovka, which is a one-way street, you will be able to drive right up to the Theatre.

Metro

Take the metro to Teatralnaya (Bolshoi Theatre exit) or Okhotnyi ryad (Theatre Square exit).

 
 
LATEST NEWS
Tickets for  Bolshoi Theater in Moscow
 
Tickets for opera,ballet and classic concerts season in Moscow . Buy online tickets at best prices for the new opera and ballet events in Moscow at Bolshoi Theater. Booking for Bolshoi Theater in Moscow.
 
Newsletter
© 2017 EUROPERA Ticket GmbH / Moscow Concert
Facebook Twitter Google +
Opernring 4/2/5/20,   Wien-1010
office@moscowoperatickets.com